Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 313 10th December 2017

The 313th Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days.  “The highlights of this week’s issue are two RCTs in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, investigating inhaled xenon and prehospital cooling respectively, meta analyses on strecritcal care reviewsss ulcer prophylaxis, polymyxin B-immobilized hemoperfusion insepsis, and lung and diaphragmatic ultrasound to predict weaning outcome; plus observational studies on prone positioning in ARDS and hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients. There are also guidelines on bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulants and emergency airway management; and excellent narrative reviews on high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in ARDS , high-flow nasal oxygen and renal replacement therapy for acute brain injury.”

The full copy of newsletter 311 26th November 2017 can be accessed via this link.

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Latest Issue of “Intensive Care Medicine” Volume 43 Number 12

intensive-care-medicineTo access Intensive Care Medicine’s latest issue’s contents page follow this link.

Articles in this issue include “Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC)”, “Terminal weaning or immediate extubation for withdrawing mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients (the ARREVE observational study)” and “The impact of frailty on ICU and 30-day mortality and the level of care in very elderly patients (≥ 80 years)”.

To access the full text of these articles from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to the journal.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 312 3rd December 2017

The 312nd Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days.  The highlights of the latest issue are “The highlights of this week’s issue are randomised controlled trials investigating prehospital antibiotics for sepsis & reducing discomfort in critically ill patients; narrative reviews on blood pressure management in acute intracerebral hemorrhage, non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, managing persistent hypoxemia & ventilator-associated pneumonia; as well as commentaries on 10 false beliefs in adult critical care nephrology, medical preprints and five ways to fix statistics.”

The full copy of newsletter 312 3rd December 2017 can be accessed via this link.

Current issue of “Intensive and Critical Care Nursing” Volume 43 December 2017

The current issue content page can be accessed via this link.

Articles published in this issue include “Tiered protocol implementation improves treatment of hypoglycaemia in a neurosciences critical care and surgical intensive care unit”, “Prevention of central venous line associated bloodstream infections in adult intintensive and critical care nursingensive care units: A systematic review” and “Going beyond “two-getherness”: Nurse managers’ experiences of working together in a leadership model where more than two share the same chair”

To access the full text of these articles direct from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

Issues of Intensive and Critical Care Nursing from issue older than one year ago can have their full text accessed via this link.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.

Intensive Care Unit Outcomes Among Patients With Cancer After Palliative Radiation Therapy

This paper by Kruser and colleagues was published in the November issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics.
Purpose:  To inform goals of care discussions at the time of palliative radiation therapy (RT) consultation, we sought to characterize intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes for patients treated with palliative RT compared to all other patients with metastatic cancer admitted to the ICU.
Methods and materials:  We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with metastatic cancer admitted to an ICU in a tertiary medical centre from January 2010 to September 2015. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients who received palliative RT in the 12 months before admission and all other patients with metastatic cancer. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between receipt of palliative RT and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for patient characteristics and acute illness severity.
Results:  Among 1424 patients with metastatic cancer, 11.3% (n=161) received palliative RT before ICU admission. In-hospital mortality was 36.7% for palliative RT patients, compared with 16.6% for other patients with metastatic cancer (P<.001). Receipt of palliative RT was associated with increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.34-3.21, P=.001), after adjusting for patient characteristics and severity of critical illness. Only 34 patients (21.1%) treated with palliative RT received additional cancer-directed treatment after ICU admission.
Conclusions:  For patients with metastatic cancer, prior treatment with palliative RT is associated with increased in-hospital mortality after ICU admission. Nearly half of patients previously treated with palliative RT either died during hospitalization or were discharged with hospice care, and few received further cancer-directed therapy. Palliative RT referral may represent an opportunity to discuss end-of-life treatment preferences with patients and families.
The article is available on the internet to those who have a personal subscription via this link to the full text.  Library members can order individual articles via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service using the article requests online via this link.

The Effect of ICU Out-of-Hours Admission on Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

This article by Galloway and others was published in the November 2017 issue of “Critical Care Medicine”

Objectives:  Organizational factors are associated with outcome of critically ill patients and may vary by time of day and day of week. We aimed to identify the association between out-of-hours admission to critical care and mortality.
Data Sources:  MEDLINE (via Ovid) and EMBASE (via Ovid).
Study Selection:  We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies on out-of-hours adult general ICU admission on patient mortality.
Data Extraction:  Meta-analyses were performed and Forest plots drawn using RevMan software. Data are presented as odds ratios ([95% CIs], p values).
Data Synthesis:  A total of 16 studies with 902,551 patients were included in the analysis with a crude mortality of 18.2%. Fourteen studies with 717,331 patients reported mortality rates by time of admission and 11 studies with 835,032 patients by day of admission. Admission to ICU at night was not associated with an increased odds of mortality compared with admissions during the day (odds ratio, 1.04 [0.98-1.11]; p = 0.18). However, admissions during the weekend were associated with an increased odds of death compared with ICU admissions during weekdays (1.05 [1.01-1.09]; p = 0.006). Increased mortality associated with weekend ICU admissions compared with weekday ICU admissions was limited to North American countries (1.08 [1.03-1.12]; p = 0.0004). The absence of a routine overnight on-site intensivist was associated with increased mortality among weekend ICU admissions compared with weekday ICU admissions (1.11 [1.00-1.22]; p = 0.04) and night time admissions compared with daytime ICU admissions (1.11 [1.00-1.23]; p = 0.05).
Conclusions: Adjusted risk of death for ICU admission was greater over the weekends compared with weekdays. The absence of a dedicated intensivist on-site overnight may be associated with increased mortality for acute admissions. These results need to be interpreted in context of the organization of local healthcare resources before changes to healthcare policy are implemented.
The article is available on the internet to those who have a personal subscription via this link to the full text.  Library members can order individual articles via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service using the article requests online via this link.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 309 12th November 2017

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature from the past week.  “It has been another great week of critical care publications, including the French NUTRIREA-2 trial, comparing early enteral with early parenteral nutrition in ventilated adults with shock (following on from CALORIES and PePANIC), the Canadian/Australian/New Zealand TRICS3 trial, comparing restrictive with liberal transfusion thresholds in the cardiac surgery patients (following on from TITRe2), as well as RCTs looking at contrast-induced nephropathy (PRESERVE) and late thromboectomy after stroke (DAWN). There are also new guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care, and European guidelines on perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in various settings, as well as narrative reviews on the neurological wake-up test, improving CPR performance and chloride in intensive care units.”

The full copy of newsletter 3094 12th November 2017 can be accessed via this link.