Early Antibiotics & Fluids Key in Sepsis Management

Sepsis and septic shock are medical emergencies that require immediate action | Anesthesiology News

Early resuscitation should begin with early antibiotics and fluids, as well as the identification of the source of infection, according to new guidelines that were released at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2017 Critical Care Congress.

In addition, the new guidelines say a health care provider who is trained and skilled in the management of sepsis should reassess the patient frequently at the bedside. “It is not the initial assessment, but the frequent reassessment that will make a difference,” said Andrew Rhodes, MD, FRCP, FRCA, FFICM, the co-chair of the guidelines committee.

Read the full news story here

Antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients

Martin-Loeches, I. et al. European Journal of Anaesthesiology. Published online: 30  January 2017

Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.

At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

Read the abstract here

Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia in the ICU: Guideline-Concordant Antibiotics and Outcome

Attridge, R.T. et al. Journal of Critical Care | Published online: August 11, 2016

L0075034 An intensive care unit in a hospital.

Image source: Robert Priseman – Wellcome Library // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Purpose: Recent data have not demonstrated improved outcomes when guideline-concordant (GC) antibiotics are given to patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between health outcomes and GC therapy in patients admitted to an ICU with HCAP.

Materials and Methods: We performed a population-based cohort study of patients admitted to >150 hospitals in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration system to compare baseline characteristics, bacterial pathogens, and health outcomes in ICU patients with HCAP receiving either GC-HCAP therapy, GC community-acquired pneumonia (GC-CAP) therapy, or non-GC therapy. The primary outcome was 30-day patient mortality. Risk factors for the primary outcome were assessed in a multivariable logistic regression model.

Results: A total of 3593 patients met inclusion criteria and received GC-HCAP therapy (26%), GC-CAP therapy (23%), or non-GC therapy (51%). GC-HCAP patients had higher 30-day patient mortality compared to GC-CAP patients (34% vs. 22%, P < .0001). After controlling for confounders, risk factors for 30-day patient mortality were vasopressor use (OR, 95% CI; 1.67, 1.30–2.13), recent hospital admission (1.53, 1.15–2.02), and receipt of GC-HCAP therapy (1.51, 1.20–1.90).

Conclusions: Our data do not demonstrate improved outcomes among ICU patients with HCAP who received GC-HCAP therapy.

Read the abstract here

Efficacy and safety of procalcitonin guidance in reducing the duration of antibiotic treatment in critically ill patients: a randomised, controlled, open-label trial

The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Median consumption of antibiotics was 7.5 daily defined doses (DDD) in the procalcitonin-guided group v 9.3 DDD in the standard-of-care group (absolute difference 2.69, p<0.0001), and median duration of treatment was 5 v 7 days respectively (absolute difference 1.22, p<0.0001).

Antibiotic resistance: World on cusp of ‘post-antibiotic era’

The world is on the cusp of a “post-antibiotic era”, scientists have warned after finding bacteria resistant to drugs used when all other treatments have failed.
They identified bacteria able to shrug off the drug of last resort – colistin – in patients and livestock in China.
They said that resistance would spread around the world and raised the spectre of untreatable infections.
It is likely resistance emerged after colistin was overused in farm animals.
Bacteria becoming completely resistant to treatment – also known as the antibiotic apocalypse – could plunge medicine back into the dark ages.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34857015