Association between acute kidney injury and neurological outcome or death at 6 months in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study

This paper by Oh and colleagues was first published online in the Journal of Critical Care during August 2019.
Purpose:  This study aimed to evaluate the association between acute kidney injury (AKI) and 6 months neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).
Materials and methods:  Prospective multi-center observational cohort included adult OHCA patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM) across 20 hospitals in the South Korea between October 2015 and October 2017. The diagnosis of AKI was made using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. The outcome was neurological outcome at 6 months evaluated using the modified Rankin scale (MRS).
Results:  Among 5676 patients with OHCA, 583 patients were enrolled. AKI developed in 348 (60%) patients. Significantly more non-AKI patients had good neurological outcome at 6 months (MRS 0–3) than AKI patients (134/235 [57%] vs. 69/348 [20%], P < .001). AKI was associated with poor neurological outcome at six months in multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio: 0.206 [95% confidence interval: 0.099–0.426], P < .001]). Cox regression analysis with time-varying covariate of AKI showed that patients with AKI had a higher risk of death than those without AKI (hazard ratio: 2.223; 95% confidence interval: 1.630–3.030, P < .001).
Conclusions:  AKI is associated with poor neurological outcome (MRS 4–6) at 6 months in OHCA patients treated with TTM.

The full text of this article is available to subscribers via this link to the journal’s homepage.  The full text of articles from issues older than sixty days is available via this link to an archive of issues of Journal of Critical Care.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

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A pilot study evaluating a simple cardiac dysfunction score to predict complications and survival among critically-ill patients with traumatic brain injury

This research by Gibbons and others was published online in the Journal of Critical Care during August 2019.
Purpose:  To describe the frequency of cardiovascular complications and cardiac dysfunction in critically-ill patients with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (msTBI) and cardiac factors associated with in-hospital survival.
Methods:  Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort study at a single Level-1 trauma center with a dedicated neuro-trauma intensive care unit (ICU). Adult patients admitted to the ICU with msTBI were consecutively enrolled in the prospective OPTIMISM study between November 2009 and January 2017. Cardiac dysfunction was measured using a combination of EKG parameters, echocardiography abnormalities, and peak serum troponin-I levels during the index hospitalization. These items were combined into a cardiac dysfunction index (CDI), ranging from 0 to 3 points and modeled in a Cox regression analysis.
Results:  A total of 326 patients with msTBI were included. For every one-point increase in the CDI, the multivariable adjusted risk of dying during the patient’s acute hospitalization more than doubled (adjusted HR 2.41; 95% CI 1.29–4.53).
Conclusion:  Cardiac dysfunction was common in patients with msTBI and independently associated with more severe brain injury and a reduction in hospital survival in this population. Further research is needed to validate the CDI and create more precise scoring tools.
The full text of this article is available to subscribers via this link to the journal’s homepage.  The full text of articles from issues older than sixty days is available via this link to an archive of issues of Journal of Critical Care.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

The impact of real-time chest compression feedback increases with application of the 2015 guidelines

This research by Davis and colleagues was published online in the Journal of Critical Care during August 2019.
Background:  Cardiac arrest survival depends upon chest compression quality. Real-time audiovisual feedback may improve compression guideline adherence, particularly with the more specific 2015 guidelines.
Methods:  Subjects included healthcare providers from multiple U.S. hospitals. Compression rate and depth were recorded using standard manikins and real-time audiovisual feedback defibrillators (ZOLL R Series). Subjects were enrolled before (n = 756) and after (n = 995) release of the 2015 guidelines, which define narrower compression targets. Subjects performed 2 min of continuous compressions before and after activation of feedback. The percentage of compressions meeting appropriate rate/depth targets was determined before and after release of the 2015 guidelines.
Results:  An increase in compression guideline adherence was observed with use of feedback before [68.7% to 96.3%, p < .001] and after [16.6% to 94.1%, p < .001] release of the 2015 guidelines. The proportion of subjects requiring feedback to achieve adherence was higher for the 2015 guidelines [28.6% vs. 78.5%, OR 9.12, 95% CI 7.33–11.35,p < .001].
Conclusions:  The use of real-time audiovisual feedback increases adherence to chest compression guidelines, particularly with application of the narrower 2015 guidelines targets for compression depth and rate.
The full text of this article is available to subscribers via this link to the journal’s homepage.  The full text of articles from issues older than sixty days is available via this link to an archive of issues of Journal of Critical Care.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Cardiac output during targeted temperature management and renal function after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

This article by Grand and colleagues was published online in the Journal of Critical Care during July 2019.
Purpose:  After resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), renal injury and hemodynamic instability are common. We aimed to assess the association between low cardiac output during targeted temperature management (TTM) and acute kidney injury (AKI) after OHCA.
Materials and methods:  Single-center substudy of 171 patients included in the prospective, randomized TTM-trial. Hemodynamic evaluation was performed with serial measurements by pulmonary artery catheter. AKI was the primary endpoint and was defined according to the KDIGO-criteria.
Results:  Of 152 patients with available hemodynamic data, 49 (32%) had AKI and 21 (14%) had AKI with need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the first three days. During targeted temperature management, patients with AKI had higher heart rate (11 beats/min, pgroup < 0.0001), higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) (4 mmHg, pgroup = 0.001) and higher lactate (1 mmol/L, pgroup < 0.0001) compared to patients without AKI. However, there was no difference in cardiac index (pgroup = 0.25). In a multivariate logistic regression model, adjusting for potential confounders, MAP (p = .03), heart rate (p = .01) and lactate (p = .006), but not cardiac output, were independently associated with AKI.
Conclusions:  Blood pressure, heart rate and lactate, but not cardiac output, during 24 h of TTM were associated with AKI in comatose OHCA-patients.
The full text of this article is available to subscribers via this link to the journal’s homepage.  The full text of articles from issues older than sixty days is available via this link to an archive of issues of Journal of Critical Care.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 345 22nd July 2018

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter “brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days.”  “The big news this week is the publication of the landmark PARAMEDIC2 trial, comparing adrenaline with placebo in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest”.  Also included are other randomised controlled trials including “Plasma-first resuscitation to treat haemorrhagic shock during emergency ground transportation in an urban area”, systematic reviews such as “Neurologic Outcomes after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Assisted CPR for Resuscitation of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients” and guidelines including “European Association for the Study of the Liver Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of patients with decompensated cirrhosis.”
The full text of the newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Current issue of Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 279 16th April 2017

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter provides the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature.  The highlights of this issue are “the TRUE-critcal care reviewsAHF trial, examining ularitide in acute heart failure, an individual patient level meta-analysis evaluating tidal volumes used in three large ARDS randomized control trials and an observational study investigating early predictors of poor outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.”

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Latest Issue of “Intensive Care Medicine” Volume 43 Number 4

To access Intensive Care Medicine’s latest issue’s contents page follow this link.

Articles in this issue include “Targeted temperature management after intraoperative cardiac arrest: a multicenter retrospective study”, “Clinical characteristics and predictors of mortality in cirrhotic patients with candidemia and intra-abdominal candidiasis: a multicenter study” and “Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in patients with acute respiratory failure”.

To access the full text of these articles from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to the journal.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.