Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 449 20th July 2020

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, provides you with the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature.
The highlights of this week’s edition are the peer reviewed preliminary results from the dexamethasone arm of the RECOVERY trial, the eagerly anticipated results from the STARRT-AKI trial, and health-related quality of life – a 6-month follow-up from the ADRENAL trial; systematic reviews and meta analyses on  tranexamic acid administration in traumatic brain injury & the association of delirium with long-term cognitive decline; and observational studies on the association between universal masking in a health care system and SARS-CoV-2 positivity among health care workers & another preliminary report of an mRNA vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. There are also narrative reviews on temporary circulatory support for cardiogenic shock, continuous‐flow left ventricular assist devices & the evaluation and management of shock in patients with COVID-19; editorials on the Covid-19 vaccine-development multiverse & the United States and the World Health Organization; and commentaries on airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2, communicating science in the time of a pandemic and improving clinical trial enrollment – in the Covid-19 era and beyond. Finally, correspondence has been published on CRASH 3 & remdesivir for Covid-19.
The full text of the issue is available via this link

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 46 Issue 8 August 2020

To view Intensive Care Medicine’s August issue’s contents page follow this link.
Articles published in this issue include: Epidemiology and burden of sepsis acquired in hospitals and intensive care units: a systematic review and meta-analysis”, “Hospital-level variation in the development of persistent critical illness” and “Mortality and host response aberrations associated with transient and persistent acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with sepsis: a prospective cohort study.”
Articles on COVID 19 these are freely available in full text to everyone.
To read the full text of any of these articles via the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to “Intensive Care Medicine” though some are available open access.  Individual articles can be ordered from the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.
The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 448 12th June 2020

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, provides you with the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature.
“Once again, this week’s edition is dominated by COVID-19. The highlights are systematic reviews and meta analyses on hospital‑ and ICU‑treated sepsis & sepsis acquired in hospitals and intensive care units; observational studies on persistent symptoms in patients after acute COVID-19, the emerging spectrum of COVID-19 neurology, the association between discharge delay from intensive care and patient outcomes & the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Spain. There are also two COVID-19 – related guidelines on the management of critically ill adults with COVID-19s & antithrombotic management in COVID-19; three excellent COVID-19 – related narrative reviews, including a general review, emerging pharmacological therapies & extrapulmonary manifestations; editorials on critical care journals during the COVID-19 pandemic & when data interpretation should not rely on the magnitude of P values; and commentaries on whether a different approach is required for COVID-19 related ARDS, airborne transmission of COVID-19 & COVID-19 clinical trials; as well as correspondence on frailty in COVID-19 patients & patient-self-inflicted lung injury in COVID-19.
The full text of the issue is available via this link

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 447 5th June 2020

The highlights of this week’s edition are the pre-print of the randomised controlled trials evaluating antibiotics in non-critically ill paediatric patients with pneumonia, including a fascinating trial comparing antibiotics with placebo, as well as two RCTs investigating vitamin C, thiamine and steroids in sepsis; systematic reviews and meta analyses on glucocorticoids in patients with ARDS (pre RECOVERY) & the use of a checklist for endotracheal intubation; and observational studies on multisystem inflammatory syndrome in U.S. children & the association of premorbid blood pressure with vasopressor infusion duration in patients with shock. There are also guidelines & recommendations on critical care ultrasound competencies & extracorporeal blood purification and organ support in the critically ill patient during the COVID-19 pandemic; narrative reviews on acute ischemic stroke & the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia in the ICU; editorials on anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis & chloroquine: to use or not to use in COVID19 ;commentaries on accelerating the development of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines the PREVENT study; as well as correspondence on COVID-19 phenotypes & rethinking the post-COVID-19 pandemic hospital: more ICU beds or smart monitoring on the wards?.
The full text of the issue is available via this link

Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study

This article from the UK Obstetric Surveillance System SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Pregnancy Collaborative Group was published online in the BMJ (Clinical research ed.) at the end of June 2020.
Objectives:  To describe a national cohort of pregnant women admitted to hospital with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the UK, identify factors associated with infection, and describe outcomes, including transmission of infection, for mothers and infants.
Design:  Prospective national population based cohort study using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS).
Setting:  All 194 obstetric units in the UK.
Participants:  427 pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 March 2020 and 14 April 2020.
Main Outcome Measures:  Incidence of maternal hospital admission and infant infection. Rates of maternal death, level 3 critical care unit admission, fetal loss, caesarean birth, preterm birth, stillbirth, early neonatal death, and neonatal unit admission.
Results:  The estimated incidence of admission to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy was 4.9 (95% confidence interval 4.5 to 5.4) per 1000 maternities. 233 (56%) pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were from black or other ethnic minority groups, 281 (69%) were overweight or obese, 175 (41%) were aged 35 or over, and 145 (34%) had pre-existing comorbidities. 266 (62%) women gave birth or had a pregnancy loss; 196 (73%) gave birth at term. Forty one (10%) women admitted to hospital needed respiratory support, and five (1%) women died. Twelve (5%) of 265 infants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, six of them within the first 12 hours after birth.
Conclusions:  Most pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection were in the late second or third trimester, supporting guidance for continued social distancing measures in later pregnancy. Most had good outcomes, and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to infants was uncommon. The high proportion of women from black or minority ethnic groups admitted with infection needs urgent investigation and explanation.
This article is freely available to all via this link

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 46 Number 7 July 2020

intensive-care-medicineTo view Intensive Care Medicine’s July issue’s contents page follow this link.
Articles published in this issue include: Managing ICU surge during the COVID-19 crisis: rapid guidelines, “Interventions for oropharyngeal dysphagia in acute and critical care: a systematic review and meta-analysisand “Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with COVID-19”.
Together with other articles on COVID 19 these are freely available in full text to everyone.
To read the full text of any of these articles via the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to “Intensive Care Medicine” though some are available open access.  Individual articles can be ordered from the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.
The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.