Critical Care Reviews Newsletter Issue 305 15th October 2017

The 305th Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings “you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days”.  The higcritcal care reviewshlights of this week’s newsletter are randomised controlled trials on tapered-cuff tracheal tubes for the prevention of micro-aspiration and red cell transfusion triggers in cardiac surgery.  There is also the protocol of the COAST trial, comparing high flow versus oxygen versus control in African children with severe pneumonia.  Narrative reviews include ones on brain monitoring in adult and paediatric ECMO patients, cardiogenic shock, intraoperative mechanical ventilation and interhospital transfer of critically ill patients.  There are editorials on fixed minimum volume sepsis resuscitation (pro & con) and when antibiotic treatment fails.

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

 

Advertisements

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 43 Number 11 November 2017

 

intensive-care-medicine

To view Intensive Care Medicine’s November issue’s contents page follow this link.

Examples of articles included in this issue are “Intermittent noninvasive ventilation after extubation in patients with chronic respiratory disorders: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (VHYPER)” and “Randomized, multicenter trial of lateral Trendelenburg versus semirecumbent body position for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia”.

To read the full text of any of these articles via the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to “Intensive Care Medicine”.  Individual articles can be ordered from the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter Issue 304 8th October 2017

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature in the last week.

critcal care reviews“The highlights of this week’s newsletter are narrative reviews on severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, ARDS and diffuse alveolar damage and non-inferiority trials; editorials on fluid therapy and suspected brain death, and commentaries on cytokine release syndrome and evaluating physical functioning in critical care.”

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Latest issue of “Journal of Critical Care” Volume 40 October 2017

journal of critical care.png

Articles published in this issue include “Prevalence and clinical significance of early high Endotoxin Activity in septic shock: an observational study”, “Systematic review and meta-analysis of renal replacement therapy modalities for acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit” and “Biomarkers kinetics in the assessment of ventilator associated pneumonia response to antibiotics – results from BioVAP study”.

The content page of this issue can be accessed via this link.  A personal subscription to the journal is required to access the full text of these articles direct from this website.  However, articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  This can be done either in person or via this link if you are a registered member of the library.

Current issue of “Intensive and Critical Care Nursing” Volume 42 October 2017

iccn

The current issue content page can be accessed via this link.

Examples of articles included in this issue are “Relatives’ satisfaction and sedation of patients in intensive care units: What are we really measuring?”, “Protective isolation precautions for the prevention of nosocomial colonisation and infection in burn patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis” and “Investigating the clinical feasibility of an adapted early mobility readiness protocol for critical ill patients: a non- randomised experimental pilot trial”.

To access the full text of these articles direct from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

Issues of Intensive and Critical Care Nursing from issue older than one year ago can have their full text accessed via this link.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.

Evaluating physical functioning in critical care: considerations for clinical practice and research

This article by Parry and colleagues appeared in the October 2017 issue of Critical Care.  The full text of this article can be found via this link.

The evaluation of physical functioning is valuable in the intensive care unit (ICU) to help inform patient recovery after critical illness, to identify patients who may require rehabilitation interventions, and to monitor responsiveness to such interventions. This viewpoint article discusses: (1) the concept of physical functioning with reference to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health; (2) the importance of measuring physical functioning in the ICU; and (3) methods for evaluating physical functioning in the ICU. Recommendations for clinical practice and research are made, along with discussion of future directions.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 1st October 2017 Issue 303

The 303rd Critical Care Reviews Newsletter brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the last week.
There are detailscritcal care reviews of the ICS State of the Art conference in Liverpool on December 4th to 6th with speakers from not only within critical care but from outside it bringing insights from areas such as acute and specialist medicine and exercise physiology.

Research highlighted in the newsletter includes “Cellular Immunotherapy for Septic Shock”, “Does high flow nasal cannula oxygen improve outcome in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure? A systematic review and meta-analysis” and “A population based cohort study on the drug specific effect of statins on sepsis outcome”.
The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.