Removal of sinks and introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care

Sinks in patient rooms are associated with hospital-acquired infections | Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control

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Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of removal of sinks from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient rooms and the introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care on gram-negative bacilli colonization rates.

Conclusions: Removal of sinks from patient rooms and introduction of a method of ‘water-free’ patient care is associated with a significant reduction of patient colonization with GNB, especially in patients with a longer ICU length of stay.

Full reference: Hopman, J. et al. (2017) Reduced rate of intensive care unit acquired gram-negative bacilli after removal of sinks and introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care. Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control. 6:59

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Monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers

Brotfein, E. et al. American Journal of Infection Control | Published online: 4 May 2017

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Highlights:

  • CCTV is a new and reliable method for observation of hand hygiene.
  • CCTV methodology records a different performing hand hygiene compared to overt observation.
  • Covert observations using CCTV can replace direct overt observation for hand hygiene of HCWs.

Read the full abstract here

The value of direct observation to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection

Afonso, E. & Blot, S. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing | Published online: 26 April 2017

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Urinary tract catheterization and monitoring of the urinary output is indispensable in critically ill patients as might indicate intravascular circulating volume, organ perfusion, and pending shock (Paratz et al., 2014; Eastwood et al., 2015). The presence of a urinary catheter however involves the risk of infection.

We read with interest the article by Galiczewski and Shurpin (2017) about the efficiency of direct observation to reduce bladder catheter utilization and catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU.

Read the comment article here

Read the original research article here

Improving the catheter associated UTI rate in an intensive care unit

Galiczewski, J.M. & Shurpin, K.M. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Published online: 22 February 2017

Background: Healthcare associated infections from indwelling urinary catheters lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of the urinary catheter insertion procedure, as compared to the standard process, decreased catheter utilization and urinary tract infection rates.

Conclusion: The findings from this study may promote changes in clinical practice guidelines leading to a reduction in urinary catheter utilization and infection rates and improved patient outcomes.

Read the full abstract here

Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between health-care workers, the environment, and patients in an intensive care unit

Price, J.R. et al. (2017) The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 17(2) pp. 207–214

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Background: Health-care workers have been implicated in nosocomial outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus, but the dearth of evidence from non-outbreak situations means that routine health-care worker screening and S aureus eradication are controversial. We aimed to determine how often S aureus is transmitted from health-care workers or the environment to patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) and a high-dependency unit (HDU) where standard infection control measures were in place.

Interpretation: In the presence of standard infection control measures, health-care workers were infrequently sources of transmission to patients. S aureus epidemiology in the ICU and HDU is characterised by continuous ingress of distinct subtypes rather than transmission of genetically related strains.

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Hand Hygiene in Intensive Care Units: A Matter of Time?

Stahmeyer, J.T. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: January 28, 2017

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Background: Healthcare-associated infections are a frequent threat to patient safety and cause significant disease burden. The most important single preventive measure is hand hygiene (HH). Barriers to adherence with HH recommendations include structural aspects, knowledge gaps, and organizational issues, especially a lack of time in daily routine.

Conclusion: Complying with guidelines is time consuming. Sufficient time for HH should be considered in staff planning.

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Nurses’ practices and knowledge about interventional patient hygiene

El-Soussi, A.H. & Asfour, H.I. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Published online: 25 January 2017

Background: The Nursing profession is struggling to return to basic nursing care to maintain patients’ safety. “Interventional patient hygiene” (IPH) is a measurement model for reducing the bioburden of both the patient and health care worker, and its components are hand hygiene, oral care, skin care/antisepsis, and catheter site care.

Conclusion: The mean percentage IPH knowledge score is higher than the mean percentage IPH practice score of all IPH items. Barriers for implementing IPH include workload, insufficient resources, and lack of knowledge/training.

Read the full abstract here