Latest issue of Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 276 26th March 2017

The 276th Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, brings you the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature over the past week.  This issue includes “major trials presented at Brussels a few days ago, as well as 10 papers from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, seven of which form this week’s Topic of the Week, starting with a paper on anemia and blood transfusion in the critically ill patient with cardiovascular disease in tomorrow’s Paper of the Day.”

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Latest issue of Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 275 19th March 2017

Welcome to the 275th Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, bringing you the best critical care research and opecritcal care reviewsn access articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days. This week’s edition is packed with cardiology trials from the American College of Cardiology Meeting in Washington DC. The highlight of this newsletter is the LEVO-CTS trial, examing levosimend
an in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing cardiac surgery. There are also excellent reviews on hepatorenal syndrome  and perfusion indices, as well as correspondence on the HYBERNATUS and INFORM trials.  The 7th and 8th talks from #CCR17 are out also – Prof Donat Spahn gives the annual honorary John Hinds Trauma Lecture and Prof John Myburgh delivers a fascinating presentation on clinical trials in “The Path to Truth“.

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Latest Issue of “Intensive Care Medicine” Volume 43 Number 4

To access Intensive Care Medicine’s latest issue’s contents page follow this link.

Articles in this issue include “Targeted temperature management after intraoperative cardiac arrest: a multicenter retrospective study”, “Clinical characteristics and predictors of mortality in cirrhotic patients with candidemia and intra-abdominal candidiasis: a multicenter study” and “Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in patients with acute respiratory failure”.

To access the full text of these articles from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to the journal.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 274 12th March 2017

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, provides the best critical care research and open access articles from across the medical literature in the last week.  The highlights of this week’s edition are a guideline on healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis, narrative reviews on status epilepticus, lactic acidosis and critical burn injuries, plus a debate on the usefulness of IVC diameter guided fluid resuscitation.

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Latest Issue of “Intensive Care Medicine” Volume 43 Number 2

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To access Intensive Care Medicine’s latest issue’s contents page follow this link.

Articles in this issue include “Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016”, “Early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients: ESICM clinical practice guidelines” and “Effects of neuromuscular blockers on transpulmonary pressures in moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome”.

To access the full text of these articles from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription to the journal.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

The full text of articles from issues older than one year ago is available via this link to an archive of issues of Intensive Care Medicine.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

Critical Care Reviews Newsletter 273 5th March 2017

The Critical Care Reviews Newsletter, bringing you the best critical care research and open critcal care reviewsaccess articles from across the medical literature over the past seven days.  The highlights of this week’s edition are randomised controlled trials on liberal versus restrictive transfusion in critically ill oncologic patients and inhaled corticosteroid and beta agonist therapy in patients at risk of ARDS; a follow up study from the PermiT Trial; a European Society of Anaesthesiology guideline on antibiotic therapy in the critically ill; as well as reviews on burns, informed consent and gender parity in critical care.

The full newsletter can be accessed via this link.

Current issue of “Intensive and Critical Care Nursing” Volume 38 Issue 1 February 2016

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The current issue content page can be accessed via this link.

Included in this issue are articles on “Learning to manage vasoactive drugs – a qualitative interview study with critical care nurses”, “Computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions after cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta analysis” and “Unexplained increases in serum vancomycin concentration in a morbidly obese patient”.

To access the full text of these articles direct from the journal’s homepage requires a personal subscription.  Individual articles can be ordered via the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.  Registered members of the library can make article requests online via this link.

Issues of Intensive and Critical Care Nursing from issue older than one year ago can have their full text accessed via this link.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.

 

Quality of clinical practice guidelines in delirium

Bush, S.H. et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e013809

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Objective: To determine the accessibility and currency of delirium guidelines, guideline summary papers and evaluation studies, and critically appraise guideline quality.

Conclusions: Delirium guidelines are best sourced by a systematic grey literature search. Delirium guideline quality varied across all six AGREE II domains, demonstrating the importance of using a formal appraisal tool prior to guideline adaptation and implementation into clinical settings. Adding more knowledge translation resources to guidelines may improve their practical application and effective monitoring. More delirium guideline evaluation studies are needed to determine their effect on clinical practice.

Read the full review here

Application of the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis (Sepsis-3) Classification: a retrospective population-based cohort study

John P Donnelly, MSPHa, b, Prof Monika M Safford, MDd, e, Nathan I Shapiro, MDf, g, Prof John W Baddley, MDc, Prof Henry E Wang, MD. Application of the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis (Sepsis-3) Classification: a retrospective population-based cohort study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases.  Online First 3 March 2017.

Study (n=30239) of 3 scores [infection and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), elevated sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), elevated quick SOFA (qSOFA)].  SIRS, SOFA, and qSOFA classifications identified different incidences and mortality. Our findings support the use of the SOFA and qSOFA classifications to identify patients with infection who are at elevated risk of poor outcomes. These classifications could be used in future epidemiological assessments and studies of patients with infection.

Transport of the critically ill child

Sarfatti, A. & Ramnarayan, P. Paediatrics and Child Health | Published online: 5 March 2017

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With the centralization of specialist services into a limited number of hospitals across the UK, an increasing number of children require an inter-hospital transfer. In 2014, 6000 critically ill or injured children were transferred between hospitals in the UK. While most of the transfers are done by specialist teams, as many as 23% are done by non-specialist teams.

These patients are some of the sickest children. It is while in transit that these patients are most at risk, and the transferring team is most exposed. To achieve a smooth and safe transfer it is important that the appropriate team with the relevant skills undertakes such transfers. The patient’s condition should be optimised before transfer and any likely difficulties are anticipated, and that the transferring team is prepared to act to resolve any complications swiftly and effectively. In this review we will attempt to offer our approach to the safe transfer of the critically ill child.

Read the abstract here