Specialist drugs used for “shock” did not lead to either fewer or extra deaths in some critical care patients

National Institute for Health Research

This synopsis from the National Institute for Health Research analyses a systematic review (177 RCTs) which found no significant difference in the death rate of patients who received a vasopressor or inotrope compared with those who did not (RR 0.98, 95%CI = 0.96 to 1.01).

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Latest Issue of the Journal of Intensive Care Medicine March 2016 Volume 31 Issue 3

The contents page of the latest issue of the Journal of Intensive Care Medicine can be accessed via this link

Articles that are included in this issue include on “The Association Between Admission Magnesium Concentrations and Lactic Acidosis in Critical Illness” and “Evaluation of Early Dexmedetomidine Addition to the Standard of Care for Severe Alcohol Withdrawal in the ICU’

To access the full text of the articles direct from the website a personal subscription is required.  Alternatively individual articles can be ordered from the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service.

Latest Issue of Journal of Intensive Care Medicine Volume 31 Number 2 February 2016

Journal of intensive care medicineThe contents page of the latest issue of the Journal of Intensive Care Medicine is available via this link

Articles include “Management of Complications of End Stage Liver Disease in the Intensive Care Unit” and “Two Methods of Hemodynamic and Volume Status Assessment in Critically Ill Patients”.

A personal subscription to the journal is required to access the full text of articles direct from the website.  You can contact the Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust Library and Knowledge Service who can obtain the full text within a few days.

Assessing the Impact of Telemedicine on Nursing Care in Intensive Care Units

This article in the American Journal of Critical Care was a benchmarking survey of nurses working in intensive care telemedicine facilities in the USA.  It included both an online survey and a modified Delphi survey.  At least 60% of respondents agreed that telemedicine in intensive care enabled them to accomplish tasks more quickly, improves collaboration, job performance and communication.  Barriers included technical problems, interruptions in care and attitudes of staff.  The findings can be used to further inform the development of competencies for tele–intensive care nursing, match the tele–intensive care nursing practice guidelines of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and highlight concepts related to the association’s standards for establishing and sustaining healthy work environment.

The full text of this article is available without the need for a password via this link.