The impact of real-time chest compression feedback increases with application of the 2015 guidelines

This research by Davis and colleagues was published online in the Journal of Critical Care during August 2019.
Background:  Cardiac arrest survival depends upon chest compression quality. Real-time audiovisual feedback may improve compression guideline adherence, particularly with the more specific 2015 guidelines.
Methods:  Subjects included healthcare providers from multiple U.S. hospitals. Compression rate and depth were recorded using standard manikins and real-time audiovisual feedback defibrillators (ZOLL R Series). Subjects were enrolled before (n = 756) and after (n = 995) release of the 2015 guidelines, which define narrower compression targets. Subjects performed 2 min of continuous compressions before and after activation of feedback. The percentage of compressions meeting appropriate rate/depth targets was determined before and after release of the 2015 guidelines.
Results:  An increase in compression guideline adherence was observed with use of feedback before [68.7% to 96.3%, p < .001] and after [16.6% to 94.1%, p < .001] release of the 2015 guidelines. The proportion of subjects requiring feedback to achieve adherence was higher for the 2015 guidelines [28.6% vs. 78.5%, OR 9.12, 95% CI 7.33–11.35,p < .001].
Conclusions:  The use of real-time audiovisual feedback increases adherence to chest compression guidelines, particularly with application of the narrower 2015 guidelines targets for compression depth and rate.
The full text of this article is available to subscribers via this link to the journal’s homepage.  The full text of articles from issues older than sixty days is available via this link to an archive of issues of Journal of Critical Care.  A Rotherham NHS Athens password is required.  Eligible staff can register for an Athens password via this link.  Please speak to the library staff for more details.

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