Can high-flow nasal cannula reduce the rate of endotracheal intubation in adult patients with acute respiratory failure compared with conventional oxygen therapy and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation?

This systematic review and meta analysis by Ni et al was published in the January 2017 issue of the journal Chest.

Background:  The effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on adult patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) are controversial. We aimed to further determine the effectiveness of HFNC in reducing the rate of endotracheal intubation in adult patients with ARF by comparison to noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and conventional oxygen therapy (COT).

Methods:  The Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) as well as the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Web of Science were searched for all the controlled studies that compared HFNC with NIPPV and COT in adult patients having ARF. The primary outcome was the rate of endotracheal intubation and the secondary outcomes were intensive care unit (ICU) mortality and length of ICU stay (ICU LOS).

Results:  Eighteen trials with a total of 3881 patients were pooled in our final studies. Except for ICU mortality (I2=67%, χ2=12.21, P=0.02) and rate of endotracheal intubation (I2=63%, χ2=13.51, P=0.02) between HFNC and NIPPV, no significant heterogeneity was found in outcome measures. Compared with COT, HFNC was associated with a lower rate of endotracheal intubation (Z=2.55, P=0.01), while no significant difference was found in the comparison with NIPPV (Z=1.40, P=0.16). As for the ICU mortality and ICU LOS, HFNC did not show any advantage over either COT or NIPPV.

Conclusions:  In patients with ARF, HFNC is a more reliable alternative of NIPPV to reduce rate of endotracheal intubation than COT.

 

The full text of the article is available to subscribers to this journal via this link.  The Library and Knowledge Service can obtain the full text of the article for registered members by requesting one via the library website request form.

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